Upcoming Events

Ignatius Donnelly: Ultimate Independent Scholar

Patrick Coleman
Saturday, March 23, 2019 - 10:00am to 11:30am
Washburn Library, 5244 Lyndale Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55419

Ignatius Donnelly; poet, promoter, politician, orator, and author; was arguably the most interesting figure in Minnesota history. Although today he is largely dismissed as a crank, Donnelly was an indefatigable champion of the nineteenth century's underdogs. His writings were both a reflection of the times and of his moods. His 1890 Caesar's Column was the first great dystopian novel and a best seller in spite of its populist pessimism. Donnelly's non-fiction ceded no field to the experts.

History Study Group

Curt Hillstrom
Thursday, March 28, 2019 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Curran's Restaurant, 42nd and Nicollet in Minneapolis


There were two books which were tied for second among those nominated and voted upon by our members. Of these two we chose Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time (1995) by Dava Sobel as the next one to read.

Philosophy Study Group

Curt Hillstrom
Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Curran's Restaurant, 42nd and Nicollet in Minneapolis



We have decided to try a different tack into the philosophy of Martin Heidegger and examine his idea of phenomenology. He disagreed with Edmund Husserl, the person who is most credited with establishing phenomenology as a modern discipline. We will try to take a look at exactly what Heidegger's disagreements were and what it means for coming to understand his concept of Being. 

The Writing Life

Emilio DeGrazia
Saturday, April 27, 2019 - 10:00am to 11:30am
Washburn Library, 5244 Lyndale Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55419

As someone who has been an active writer for more than half a century, I have benefited from the prestige and authority conferred on the general culture by the invention of the printing press.  Since that time books have had a short 500-year run, and a mixed success, as cultural influences.  While the book’s influence seems to be in decline since the advent of the digital age, we ironically have more books being published today than at any other time in history.  What roles do contemporary writers now fulfill, and how should a “serious” writer define this role?  I hope to address these issues from my own pers

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